Ulysses S. Grant

[© 2017]

Explain Dominant Color Explain Auxiliary Color

The Yellow in this spiritual portrait represents Grant's very slight preference for pragmatism over idealism. In Introverts, the dominant function is directed inwardly, and spiritual portraits use a long horizontal line to represent this. This preference is very slight and would be more evident in his role as a soldier than it would be in his role as president.

The Green in this spiritual portrait represents Grant's very slight preference for making logical decisions. In Introverts, the auxiliary function is directed outwardly and is more evident than the dominant function. This preference is very slight and would be more evident in his role as a soldier than it would be in his role as a father.

18th President of the USA — Mar. 4, 1869 to Mar. 4, 1877

Although my process identifies Ulysses S. Grant as an ISTJ, it shows very slight preferences in all four pairs of opposites. Interestingly, one source ....

Show the Story Show the Meat Portrait

Ulysses S. Grant:
The Story

Although my process identifies Ulysses S. Grant as an ISTJ, it shows very slight preferences in all four pairs of opposites. Interestingly, one source identifies him as an xNTJ and another identifies him as an ISFJ.

Colorful Images Mean Versatile Personalities

The spiritual portraits of people with mild preferences are more colorful than the images of people with strong preferences. This reflects the fact that they are more versatile and adaptable rather than inflexible and set in their ways.

I believe it is much more important to recognize Grant's preferences were slight than it is to agree on a specific four-letter type. Although it can be interesting to speculate what type historical characters were, it's important to realize that ultimately this is all purely speculation — especially when it comes to Introverts.

Clearly an Introvert

It's clear to me he was an Introvert. Time and again historians have remarked he liked to be alone to reflect on things and could be hard to read.

He felt he was at his best when he was alone. He liked to think through things. He liked quiet time.
- Donald L. Miller, Historian

Seeing Both the Forest and the Trees

Although failing to immediately notice certain facts can quickly get a soldier in trouble, a general who can see both the forest and the trees is in a better position than his peers who can't see the big picture.

A general who can ride around the battlefield, and by glimpsing: men advancing over there, troops forming up over here, artillery firing somewhere in the distance, and can put all of these pieces together in his head, and see what is actually happening, through the smoke, that is a General who has an extraordinary gift.
- Geoffrey Perret, Biographer

Along with an attention to detail, Grant certainly had his ideals. Before the war, he set a slave free rather than sell him, and after the war he wanted nothing more than to find peace with the plains indians and stubborn racist southerners. But this does not mean he had his head in the clouds:

Keeping It Real

Later in life, Grant became friends with Mark Twain, who helped him publish his personal memoirs shortly after Grant's death in 1885.

Having lunch with Grant is like having pork and beans with Julius Ceasar.
- Mark Twain

Twain's quote makes me wish we had time machines and could visit with people who are no longer with us. Rather than long for things we will never have, it's probably best to just be grateful for the next best thing: having videos such as this one that we can watch!


This profile of Ulysses S. Grant is based on the nearly four-hour-long Ulysses S. Grant Warrior President DVD.