Benjamin Franklin

[© 2018]

Explain Dominant Color Explain Auxiliary Color

The Blue in this spiritual portrait represents Benjamin Franklin's dominant personality trait, his openness to new ideas. In Extraverts, the dominant trait is directed outwardly, and spiritual portraits use a long vertical line to represent this, because it is the side of their personality that is most evident. He demonstrated this trait by imagining and creating inventions, such as lightening rods, bifocal glasses, and the Franklin stove.

The Green in this spiritual portrait represents Benjamin Franklin's auxiliary personality trait, his preference for objectivity over subjectivity. In Extraverts, the auxiliary trait is directed inwardly, and spiritual portraits use a horizontal line to represent this. He demonstrated this trait in the way he regarded all religions to be equal and did not consider any single one of them to be any better than the others.

Founding Father and Sixth President of Pennsylvania

Benjamin Franklin's story is ....

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Benjamin Franklin:
The Story

Benjamin Franklin's story is not yet ready, but you can read a review of the books and videos to create this and the other Founding Fathers' spiritual portraits on this site in Hamilton and Jefferson Were Both Awesome on tomhartung.com.

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Founding Fathers on ArtsyVisions.com

There are stories about Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton on ArtsyVisions.com.

Hamilton and Jefferson were different in many ways — and these articles put their differences in a new perspective — so check them out today!


About This Portrait

This spiritual portrait is based on the biography Benjamin Franklin: An American Life, by Walter Isaacson.

Published in 2004, Isaacson's book is a great read, and I recommend it highly!