Robert Baratheon

[© 2017]

Explain Dominant Color Explain Auxiliary Color

The Green in this spiritual portrait represents Robert Baratheon's dominant trait, his rationality. In Extraverts, the dominant trait is directed outwardly, and spiritual portraits use a long vertical line to represent this, because it is the side of their personality that is most evident. He demonstrates this trait with his constant and merciless verbal abuse of his squire, Lancel Lannister.

The Yellow in this spiritual portrait represents Robert Baratheon's auxiliary trait, his pragmatism. In Extraverts, the auxiliary trait is directed inwardly, and spiritual portraits use a horizontal line to represent this. He demonstrates this trait when he hedonisticly indulges in food, drink, and prostitutes.

King of Westeros

In Westeros, the slightest hint of disrespect towards The King — even a Mad King — is an act of treason. And any treasonous act, whether ....

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Robert Baratheon:
The Story

In Westeros, the slightest hint of disrespect towards The King — even a Mad King — is an act of treason. And any treasonous act, whether real or only perceived, inevitably leads to a punishment that is at best permanently shameful, and at worst severe, instantaneous, and permanent in the very worst sense of the word.

Even those closest to King Baratheon, people like his wife Cersei and his best friend Ned, tremble in fear at the thought of saying something that might somehow be interpreted as posing even the slightest affront to His Majesty's sensibilities.

Robert may seem warm and friendly to some observers, because we see him through Ned Stark's eyes. But to anyone blessed — or cursed, as the case may be — with being in a position of power in George R.R. Martin's universe, emotions such as sympathy and compassion are seen as weaknesses. And as The King, he must be hard-nosed, thick-skinned, and ultimately heartless.

Don't be fooled by his hearty laugh! It conceals a cold, cynical heart:

They never tell you how they all shit themselves [when they die in battle]. They don't put that part in the songs.

For The King to exhibit any sentimentality whatsoever in this universe is to show weakness and invite usurpation.

I would imagine a portrait of Stannis Baratheon would look similar to this, but with less Red and Blue. And a portrait of Renly Baratheon would look similar as well, but with more Red and Blue — but not as much as Ned's!

With a spiritual portrait similar to the one on this site of Film Noir's Mike Hammer, it's obvious King Robert Baratheon, and his brothers Stannis and Renly, are powerful people. And only a fool would try to mess with any of them!